Ten weepers from the tomb of…

Renier van Thienen (attributed to), c. 1475 - c. 1476, tomb figure, BK-AM-33-E

Isabella of Bourbon, wife of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, Brabant and Limburg and count of Flanders, Holland and Zeeland, died in 1465. He had a superb tomb made for her at St Michiel’s Abbey in Antwerp. Around it stood 24 figures of grieving relatives and ancestors - called weepers. They…

On display in room 0.4

Ten weepers from the tomb of…

Renier van Thienen (attributed to), c. 1475 - c. 1476, tomb figure, BK-AM-33-H

Isabella of Bourbon, wife of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, Brabant and Limburg and count of Flanders, Holland and Zeeland, died in 1465. He had a superb tomb made for her at St Michiel’s Abbey in Antwerp. Around it stood 24 figures of grieving relatives and ancestors - called weepers. They…

Ten weepers from the tomb of…

Renier van Thienen (attributed to), c. 1475 - c. 1476, tomb figure, BK-AM-33-B

Isabella of Bourbon, wife of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, Brabant and Limburg and count of Flanders, Holland and Zeeland, died in 1465. He had a superb tomb made for her at St Michiel’s Abbey in Antwerp. Around it stood 24 figures of grieving relatives and ancestors - called weepers. They…

On display in room 0.4

The Meeting of Joachim and Anna

Meester van Joachim en Anna, c. 1470, BK-NM-88

Joachim and Anna were childless for many years. Until Anna’s prayers were answered and she miraculously conceived a daughter, Mary. Joyous at the news, they embrace each other tenderly. This intimate, almost timeless scene was once part of a large altar depicting stories about the life of the Virgin…

On display in room 0.1

Lidded ewer

Adam van Vianen (I), 1614, BK-1976-75

On display in room 2.1

A Militiaman Holding a Berkemeyer,…

Frans Hals, c. 1628 - c. 1630, painting, SK-A-135

This cheery young man is raising his glass as if to propose a toast. Although the fashion was then for intricate, detailed paintings, Hals applied his paints with quick, confident strokes. This style of painting gives the subject a real sense of movement. This is most obvious with the right hand.

On display in Gallery of Honour

Still Life with Asparagus

Adriaen Coorte, 1697, painting, SK-A-2099

Most of Coorte’s paintings are small, intimate still lifes. With their simple subjects - asparagus, or berries - his paintings contrast starkly with the magnificent, extravagant still lifes then in vogue. Those pictures are all about the profusion of valuable objects and foods, while here the…

On display in Philips wing, room 1.7

Banquet at the Crossbowmen’s Guild…

Bartholomeus van der Helst, 1648, painting, SK-C-2

Civic guards were the city’s militia. They were volunteers. In Amsterdam, each district had its own company with its own headquarters. In the 17th century, larger and grander buildings were built. Group portraits of the members lined the walls. In 1648, Van der Helst immortalised this Amsterdam…

On display in room 2.8

Self-portrait

Vincent van Gogh, 1887, painting, SK-A-3262

After he heard his brother Theo describe the new colourful style of French art, Vincent decided in 1886 to move to Paris. He soon began experimenting with the new idiom in a series of self portraits. This was mainly to spare the expense of using models. Here he painted himself as a debonnaire…

On display in room 1.18

William of Orange

Adriaen Thomasz. Key, c. 1579, painting, SK-A-3148

Of all the nobles in the Low Countries to join the revolt against the Spanish crown, the foremost was William of Orange (1533-1584). Raised at the court of Charles V, he was a consummate diplomat: hence his nickname, the Silent. He emerged as the leader of the insurrection against Spain. In 1580,…

On display in room 2.1